CS Lewis and the Bible

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From Consider the Lilies:

I wrote a two-part series on this blog called “Narnia: Growing Up,” in which I expose the occult nature of CS Lewis’s fantasy series The Chronicles of Narnia. Go here and here to read it. In the pages below, I discuss Lewis’s unorthodox (heterodox, heretical) views on the Bible, as he explained them in his non-fiction writings. Continue reading →

Narnia: Growing Up (Part 2)

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Consider the Lilies

“I did not say to myself, ‘Let us represent Jesus as He really is in our world by a Lion in Narnia’: I said, ‘Let us suppose that there were a land like Narnia and that the Son of God, as He became a Man in our world, became a Lion there, and then imagine what would have happened.’”[1]

Lewis-and-Aslan narniaWas C. S. Lewis aware of occult elements in Narnia? Yes. In his autobiography Surprised by Joy (1955), Lewis said that he was exposed to the occult as a teenager, long before his spurious conversion to Christianity in 1929.[2] His teacher Miss C., “floundering in the mazes of Theosophy, Rosicrucianism, Spiritualism, the whole Anglo-American occult tradition,” destroyed Lewis’s budding faith (56).[3] As a result, he struggled with a “passion for the Occult” the rest of his life, which he called a “spiritual lust” (57). The “Christian” Lewis could…

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Narnia: Growing Up (Part 1)

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Consider the Lilies

“For the time will come when they will not endure sound doctrine; but after their own lusts shall they heap to themselves teachers, having itching ears; and they shall turn away their ears from the truth, and shall be turned unto fables.” (2 Timothy 4:3-4)[1]

gnosticism heresyThe plural form of the English word “fable” appears five times in the King James Bible, a translation of the Greek mythos (G.3454), from which we get the English word myth.[2] According to Thayer’s Greek Lexicon, it can mean a speech, word, saying, narrative, or story. The latter two meanings can be true or false, i.e. fiction, fable, or falsehood. However, mythos is translated only as “fable” in the New Testament, something inherently false. Peter and Paul designated as fables the “traditions and speculations … of the Jews on religious questions” (Easton Bible Dictionary). In their commentary on 1 Timothy…

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QUOTE (Victor Hugo)

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A DEVOTED LIFE

Victor_Hugo_001“Have courage for the great sorrows of life and patience for the small ones; and when you have laboriously accomplished your daily task, go to sleep in peace. God is awake.” ~Victor Hugo

In honor of Victor Hugo, a French author best known for his novels Les Misérables  and The Hunchback of Notre Dame, who was born on this day in 1802.

Resources:
Victor Hugo
Victor Hugo>Quotes

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Wheatley and Race: Blind Spots

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Arts & Culture

henry-louis-gates phillis-wheatleyIn The Trials of Phillis Wheatley (2003), Henry Louis Gates Jr. discusses the various cultural trials that Phillis Wheatley (c.1754-1784) endured as a slave poet in order to “audition for the humanity of the entire African people” (27).[1] The first trial took place in 1772, before an eighteen-member panel of Boston’s civic and moral leaders. They wanted both to “verify the authorship of her poems” and to answer the question of whether blacks were capable of higher reasoning, thereby “producing literature” (5). Although Wheatley passed the trial, a skeptical Boston public still refused to print her work; she had to go to London to see Poems on Various Subjects, Religious and Moral (1773) published, through a benefactor (30-31). As a result, English reviewers “condemned the hypocrisy of a colony that insisted on liberty and equality when it came to its relationship to England but did not extend those principles…

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The “Christmas Candle” Delusion

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Arts & Culture

christmas-candleI’d wanted to watch The Christmas Candle (2013) ever since I saw the trailer. The film’s high-quality production impressed me. So did its cast: Samantha Barks from Les Miserables (2012), British singer Susan Boyle, James Cosmo from The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe (2005), Barbara Flynn, Hans Matheson, and others. When a local library acquired the DVD this week, I eagerly borrowed it. But the film was a sore disappointment. Not only that, it was blasphemy. The ironically named Christmas Candle “put darkness for light and light for darkness” (Isaiah 5:20). “Blasphemy?” you say. “What a loaded word. This is a Christmas film about miracles!” Is it, really? Instead of the miracle of Jesus Christ’s birth, I saw only occult-like superstition and witchcraft. Pastor David Richmond tries to sweep it all away with the gospel, but he fails in his task.

This film begins with the centuries-old legend of the “Christmas…

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Christ and Culture

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Interpreting Romans 14 and 1 Corinthians 10 used to be difficult for me. My Christian world was black and white. If something was bad for me, then it was bad for everyone. If something was good for me, then it was good for everyone. I didn’t understand strong and weak consciences and didn’t know what to do with grey areas like culture. I didn’t always censor what I watched, read, and listened to either because I didn’t believe in “see no evil, hear no evil, speak no evil.” I thought, God sees it all. Why can’t I? He doesn’t censor secular culture. Why should I? Continue reading →

High Noon

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In the film High Noon (1952), Frank Miller returns home from prison with some outlaw friends. At noon they intend to take revenge against retiring Marshal Will Kane (Gary Cooper), who lawfully sent Miller there after a fair trial. Fowler’s Quaker bride Amy (Grace Kelly) wants him to retire as planned. However, after the fearful town refuses to help the marshal do his job, Fowler is forced to kill the outlaws alone. It’s high noon. Continue reading →

“Rich Men”: The World of Mrs Bennet

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“It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife.” ~Jane Austen

There are several film versions of Jane Austen’s book Pride and Prejudice, but only one for me: the 1995 version. It is a period piece showing how primogeniture made marriage almost necessary for a woman’s survival. The literary criticism featured below does a good job of pointing out how Mrs Bennet, the mother of five daughters, was not so mercenary as pragmatic. Continue reading →

Jane: “My dearest sister, now be serious. I want to talk very seriously. Let me know everything that I am to know, without delay. Will you tell me how long you have loved him [Mr Darcy]?”

Elizabeth: “It has been coming on so gradually, that I hardly know when it began. But I believe I must date it from my first seeing his beautiful grounds at Pemberley.”

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Elvine Johannessen Tweten: A Woman of Faith

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“This is the victory that overcomes the world, even our faith” (1 John 5:4).

I’m guessing you’ve never heard of Elvine Johannessen Tweten (1893-1977). She was a Norwegian immigrant to North America in the early twentieth century, a preacher’s wife, a mother of seven children, a woman of unusual grace and goodness, and, as we learn late in her story, the descendant of a powerful Norwegian family. Hers is a remarkable story, that her oldest daughter, Margaret Jensen, shortchanges in First We Have Coffee (1982). Continue reading